COMPARE THE HIGH LINE (NY) AND UNFINISHED SPACES (CUBA)

Introduction

The documentary unfinished spaces directed by Benjamin Murray and Alysa Nahmias details a great architectural revolution in Cuba (Budds, 2011). The story is told of Cuban president, Fidel Castro to foster and nature creative generations and provides them with an outlet for horning their skills and talents. The film gives a historical account following the 1959 revolution when Fidel Castro decrees that on the sprawling golf course to be built a school specifically dedicated for art.  On the other end, the Story of New York City’s park, High Line, details an elevated freight rail line which was later to be transformed in to a public park (David, & Hammond, 2011). The park is situated on Manhattans Westside. This historic structure was under the threat of demolition but the friends of the highline fought for its preservation as well as transformation. The two videos share a number of similarities much as they also differ in various ways. As such, this essay highlights these similarities and differences through taking in to account the historical perspective, architecture and contemporary usage.

Discussion

A number of similarities can be drawn from these two videos. These include the following: Firstly, they both detail an instance of struggle. The highline (NY) was under threat of demolition and was selflessly fought for by the friends of Highline to ensure the preservation and transformation of the facility as a public open space for recreation (David, & Hammond, 2011). Similarly, unfinished spaces of Cuba witnessed a period of struggle. It feature an intimate footage that depicts Fidel Castro as a devoted person with a view of creating g a worldwide art centre and documenting the struggle of the three passionate and revolutionary architects (Budds, 2011). The prevailing political climate during the construction of this centre led to halting of the structure and the architects designs deemed irrelevant. This would leave the school unfinished for forty years.   Secondly, the architecture has now become an attraction to many and draws visitors from different parts of the world. The High line (NY) is now a conservancy for visitors to enjoy (David, & Hammond, 2011); while unfinished spaces documents the history of architecture through the national art school for Cuban prosperity and the benefit of the world (Budds, 2011).

Additionally, the two videos detail the facilities as symbols for the cities and countries. High Line is a historic structure that is seen by others as a symbol and catalyst for preserving neighborhoods. Unfinished space promotes a dialogue that is open-minded about the culture of the Cuban people providing recognition for architecture (Budds, 2011). Also important to note is that both were abandoned for some time. Unfinished spaces was abandoned for a period of forty years while High Line was abandoned remaining unused especially in the 1990s. Both structures were demolished at some point with Highline witnessing the same in 1960 and 1991while unfinished space came up from destruction of a golf course. Nonetheless both facilities are now beautiful places for public interaction viewed as monumental places rich in history. Further, both projects involve an integration of landscape and building in an innovative manner so as to enable people interacts with the landscape integration with architecture. The High Line even though is not a school, provides individuals with a special creative space for a generation of the New York residents and visitors in a manner that can be compared to what the Cuban School of art has been providing over time for the Cuban people. Both architectures provide for social cohesion, cultural vitality and enhanced quality of life as integration with open spaces and also appreciation of historical achievements.

However, the two videos document some differences among them. The documentary unfinished spaces directed by Benjamin Murray and Alysa Nahmias details a great architectural revolution in Cuba with a view to educate while On the other end, the inside Story of New York City’s park, High Line, details an elevated freight rail line which was later to be transformed in to a public park meant for relaxation (David, & Hammond, 2011). The objective of the two facilities set them apart since the later provides for recreational and relaxation purposes while the former concerns educational or skills building and historical purpose. Moreover, the High Line is situated in New York which is in the United States while unfinished space is located in Cuba making them be in different countries. Another significant difference can be found in the construction of the two facilities.  The documentary unfinished spaces directed by Benjamin Murray and Alysa Nahmias details construction from a golf course. This could be seen as construction from scratch. The president of Cuba at that moment, Fidel Castro decreed that in the golf course to be built an art school (Budds, 2011). The high line on the other end was a mere preservation of an already built structure for which people felt needed to be conserved rather than damaged. Further, Cuban art school, also reefed to as the unfinished space has never been completed and instead preserved to give a historic account of the architecture that inspired its construction following the cut funding (Budds, 2011). However, High Line is a completed construction of an open space serving purposes of recreation and relaxation.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the documentary unfinished spaces directed by Benjamin Murray and Alysa Nahmias details a great architectural revolution in Cuba which gives a historic account of the National Art School (Budds, 2011). Similarly, the Story of New York City’s park, High Line, details an elevated freight rail line which was later to be transformed in to a public park. These two places despite their historical, environmental, social, and economic importance have some fundamental similarities and differences. These enable comparison between them that informs on their historical significance as well as their architectural relevance. They differ fundamentally by location, purpose and structure among other differences identified in this paper. Nevertheless, they have similarities that include struggles that characterized the facilities’ foundation, halting or abandonment of the facilities, symbolic structure that they have become, public interaction roles they play and as place for visitation by the public. These differences and similarities define their uniqueness and beauty respectively.

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